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Short Courses

  • GeoMontreal is planning 9 short courses to be held on the Sunday before the conference starts.

  • All Short Course Instruction will be in English.

  • Lunch is included in all full day (8-hour) courses only.

  • Conference Organizer Reserves the Right to Cancel a Course if Registration is Insufficient.

  • Short courses are open to those not attending the conference.

SC 1 - Construction Dewatering: From Field Studies to Decommissioning

Date: Sunday, September 15, 2024

Time: 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Duration: 4 hours

Price: $250 CAD per participant, $125 CAD per student participant (with valid student ID)

Description

The workshop covers a broad range of topics related to construction dewatering. It allows participants to acquaint themselves with factors to be considered in designing, permitting, and operating a dewatering system. Are discussed the critical factors and baseline field studies required to support dewatering system design, the approaches to calculating flow rates and dewatering zones of influence, designing and permitting a dewatering system, dewatering methods and costs, groundwater quality issues, available treatment methods and costs, pumps and powering requirements, installing and operating a dewatering system, determining dewatering specifications for contractual purposes, as well as project structure and risk sharing. Some case studies are reviewed to illustrate both successful and unsuccessful construction dewatering applications.

Instructor

Stephen Di Biase holds a master’s degree in Hydrogeology from University of Toronto. He is a Senior Hydrogeologist at Stantec with 24 years of experience in groundwater supply development and construction dewatering. His experience includes hydrogeological assessments and impact evaluations for high-yield production wells and for construction dewatering projects, in the overburden aquifers of the Greater Toronto Area and in the Silurian dolostone formations above the Niagara Escarpment, as well as the investigations, design, construction and monitoring of dewatering systems along the Toronto-York Spadina Subway Extension, Eglinton Crosstown and Bayview Avenue widening.

SC 2 - Digging Deeper into Geotechnical Instrumentation and Monitoring

Date: Sunday, September 15, 2024

Time: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Duration: 8 hours

Price: $450 CAD per participant, $250 CAD per student participant (with valid student ID)

Description

Geotechnical design embraces uncertainty. That uncertainty is assessed during the construction and operational phases using various instruments and methods. The workshop covers in detail the different types of geotechnical instruments, surveying methods and remote sensing methods commonly used for short-term and long-term monitoring of geotechnical structures. It is assumed that participants have already a certain level of exposure to geotechnical instrumentation as the technical level intended will go deeper than an introductory course and, in even more details, than the content of Chapter 25 on Geotechnical Instrumentation and Monitoring of the Canadian Foundation Engineering Manual (2023). The following instruments and technologies are discussed: piezometers, inclinometers, settlement systems, extensometers, strain gauges, load cells, geodetic measurements, satellite InSAR, ground-based radar, lidar, vibration, strong and weak motion, and dynamic measurements. An invited speaker addresses measurements associated with groundwater monitoring in the field of hydrogeology.

Instructor

Pierre Choquet has a Ph.D. in Mécanique numérique et matériaux from Mines Paris – PSL in France. Specialised in geotechnical instrumentation, he is a Technical Advisor to Terra Insights and Vice-President of Market Development for RST Instruments.

SC 3 - Moving to 3D Slope Stability Analysis

Date: Sunday, September 15, 2024

Time: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Duration: 8 hours

Price: $450 CAD per participant, $250 CAD per student participant (with valid student ID)

Description

2D slope stability analysis has been a common form of geotechnical analysis. Current regulatory guidelines primarily reference 2D analysis. The geotechnical practice has recently seen the rise of 3D analysis methodologies. This movement to 3D analysis options raises questions related to the application of 3D methodologies in geotechnical practice. When should 3D analysis be performed in design? Should calibration to known failures be performed in 2D or 3D? What are the implications of either approach? How should regulatory guidelines be interpreted when performing 3D analysis? The workshop provides training on the differences between 2D and 3D slope stability analysis. Its primary emphasis is on limit equilibrium methods (LEM) with a focus on when 3D methods should be employed in engineering practice. Example case studies of forensic analysis from the mining world (Fundao & Feijao) as well as embankments analysed in 3D provide an examination of the 3D methodologies in practice. The typical variances that can be expected between 2D and 3D slope stability methods are discussed along with the time when 3D back-analysis should be performed. Special consideration of seismic analysis is also discussed in the context of new methods of analysis.

Instructors

Murray Fredlund holds a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from the University of Saskatchewan. He has published over 120 research papers on topics related to database design, finite element modeling, and unsaturated soil knowledge-based database systems. In 1997, he started SoilVision Systems Ltd. with a database software product called SoilVision which could be used to estimate unsaturated soil behavior. He has since directed the development of eight finite element software packages covering areas of groundwater flow, contaminant transport, geothermal analysis, air-flow analysis, stress/deformation, and slope stability. More recent work has involved supervising the development of the 2D/3D SVSLOPE slope stability software and the SVDESIGNER conceptual modeling software. This work has continued with the expansion of 3D slope stability analysis into the areas of mining such as the analysis of open pits, tailings dams, power dams, and landslide risk analysis.

Mourad Karray received a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from Université de Sherbrooke where he has been a Full Professor since 2005. His research emphasises the dynamic and vibratory behavior of soils, from soil-structure interaction to soil characterization methods based on Rayleigh waves. His work has led to the publication of over 220 scientific papers. He has also contributed to the development of the Piezo-electric-Ring-Actuator-Technique used for measuring Vs in the laboratory and the Triaxial Simple Shear Test, for assessing the seismic resistance of soils.

SC - 4 Rock Mechanics: Modeling Discrete Fracture Networks

from LIDAR and Digital Photogrammetry Mapping

Date: Sunday, September 15, 2024

Time: 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Duration: 4 hours

Price: $250 CAD per participant, $125 CAD per student participant (with valid student ID)

Description

The workshop presents the technical notions necessary to generate Discrete Fracture Networks from remote sensing topographical data sets, for example LiDAR, and import and use them in conventional numerical modelling tools for rock engineering stability analysis. The workshop is intended to be a hands-on learning experience built around practical examples. Special considerations are given to standard best practices and common correction methods required to address typical data collection bias. The workshop takes place in a computer lab at École de Technologie Supérieure which is within walking distance of the Hotel Bonenvature where GEOMontréal 2024 is held. Computers, software, and data sets needed for the workshop are provided.

Instructor

Pedro Cacciari detains a Ph.D. in Science from University of São Paulo in Brazil and he has over 6 years of experience in the industry. He is an Assistant Professor of rock mechanics in the Département de génie civil, géologique et des mines at École Polytechnique. His expertise lies in investigating discontinuous rock masses by integrating experimental and numerical methods.

SC 5 - Satellite Remote Sensing Applied to Geotechnical Engineering and Hydrogeology

Date: Sunday, September 15, 2024

Time: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Duration: 8 hours

Price: $450 CAD per participant, $250 CAD per student participant (with valid student ID)

Description

The workshop is an introduction to remote sensing techniques applied to hydrogeology and geotechnical studies. It is designed for the geotechnicians, hydrogeologists, and students who want to better understand the potential and limitation of various satellite remote sensing approaches. An overview of satellites and techniques applicable to groundwater and land surface deformation studies are proposed, including examples of GNSS/GPS, GRACE, Infrared (IR), and several optical and radar satellites, as well as an introduction to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Case studies based on InSAR and on challenges such as rock mechanics, land slides, permafrost deformation, mining, and land subsidence are presented. A demonstration of land subsidence using free InSAR satellite data and software and applications of Google Earth Engine to land surface monitoring are also presented.

Instructors

Angus Calderhead is a Senior Hydrogeologist at Environment and Climate Change Canada and an Associate Professor at the Terre Environnement Research Centre of Institut national de la recherche scientifique. He has been using remote sensing techniques for the past 20 years to better understand hydrogeological and geotechnical processes, mostly focusing on InSAR, GNSS, and gravity recovery satellite systems.

François Charbonneau obtained a Ph.D. in Remote Sensing from Université de Sherbrooke. He works at Canada Centre for Mapping and Earth Observation as a research scientist specialised in remote sensing SAR application development. He focuses on optimizing the polarimetric and interferometric SAR information applied to the detection and characterization of terrestrial surface changes.

Catherine Cloutier received a PH.D. in Earth Science from Université Laval. She is a Geological Engineer at Ministère des Transports et de la Mobilité durable in Québec where she conducts rock face stability studies. During her doctoral studies, she documented the evolution of an active rockslide with the aim of developing a warning system for a railroad.

 

Saeid Homayouni holds a PH.D. in Signal and Image from Télécom Paris in France. He is Professor of Remote Sensing and Environmental Geomatics at the Eau Terre Environnement Research Centre of Institut national de la recherche scientifique. His research and teaching interests include the analysis of Earth observations (optical and radar) using artificial intelligence for urban and agri-environmental applications.

Pascal Locat has a PH.D. in Civil Engineering from Université Laval. He has worked as a Geological Engineer at the Ministère des Transports et de la Mobilité durable in Québec since 2005.

SC 6 - Seismic Geotechnics and Soil-Structure Interaction

Date: Sunday, September 15, 2024

Time: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Duration: 8 hours

Price: $450 CAD per participant, $250 CAD per student participant (with valid student ID)

Description

The workshop addresses the seismic and post-seismic problems in soils and tailings in the context of eastern North American seismicity and the various alternatives made available to better meet the needs of Quebec engineers. Are discussed the assessment of vibration modes using ambient noise, the different approaches available for dynamic analyses and their advantages and disadvantages, new approaches developed to assess liquefaction potential in a way that is better adapted to Quebec's seismic context, the assessment of the dynamic response of dikes and dams with accurate data, soil degradation curves with particular emphasis on Quebec's sensitive silts and clays, and the soil-structure interaction and its importance in foundation design. Post-liquefaction problems (settlement, landslides, etc.) that may occur after an earthquake are also discussed, along with new developments in settlement assessment. Practical examples are used during the workshop to help engineers better master liquefaction analysis in their practice.

Instructors

Anna Chiaradonna received a Ph.D. in Geotechnical Engineering from the University of Napoli Federico II in Italy. She is an Assistant Professor in Geotechnical Engineering at the Department of Civil, Construction-Architectural and Environmental Engineering of the University of L’Aquila in Italy. Her research focuses on numerically and experimentally studying ground failure due to earthquake-induced liquefaction and on its mitigation. Her work also focuses on the forecast of excess pore pressure with different approaches in the assessment of liquefaction triggering and consequences on the built environment.

Mahmoud N. Hussien detains a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from Kyoto University in Japan. He is a Principal Geotechnical Engineer at WSP Canada. He has over 20 years of international expertise in geotechnical engineering relating to earthquakes, with a focus on seismic soil-structure interaction and seismic stability of tailing dams. He has published over 50 geotechnical papers in leading international journals and conferences.

Michael James holds a Ph.D. in Mineral Engineering from Université de Montréal. With 40 years of experience, he is a Geotechnical Engineer specializing in the seismic performance of dams and tailings impoundments and in numerical analysis. He is also an Engineer of Record for Agnico Eagle Mines in Canada and Mexico.

Mourad Karray received a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from Université de Sherbrooke where he has been a Full Professor since 2005. His research emphasises the dynamic and vibratory behavior of soils, from soil-structure interaction to soil characterization methods based on Rayleigh waves. His work has led to the publication of over 220 scientific papers. He has also contributed to the development of the Piezo-electric-Ring-Actuator-Technique used for measuring Vs in the laboratory and the Triaxial Simple Shear Test, for assessing the seismic resistance of soils.

Daniel Verret holds a PH.D. in Civil Engineering from Université Laval. He has been working in the fields of geotechnics and embankment dams for over 25 years. He is a geotechnical engineer specialising notably in dynamic and vibration analysis of soils.

SC 7 - Deformation and Stability Assessment for Dams and Tailings Facilities

Date: Sunday, September 15, 2024

Time: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Duration: 8 hours

Price: $450 CAD per participant, $250 CAD per student participant (with valid student ID)

Description

The workshop reviews how to develop, analyze, and interpret stability and deformation analyses (static and seismic) for earthfill dams and tailings storage facilities (TSFs) from a design and risk perspective. It includes viewpoints from both clients and consulting engineers on how these analyses can be used to help inform project decisions. Instructors share practical experiences from their involvement in projects around the world and explain their thought process to evaluate the suitability of different design options/methodologies with respect to project risks and design efficiency. The topics covered are as follows: the selection of stability and deformation design criteria (static and seismic), the applicability of different analysis methods (2D vs 3D and stability vs deformation), the capturing of soil behaviour through constitutive model and parameter selection (model calibration), the evaluation of liquefaction potential under static and seismic loading, and considerations for risk assessments.

Instructors

Daniel G. Bertrand is a Senior Engineer and an Associate of Klohn Crippen Berger’s Calgary Office. His 35 years of civil and geotechnical engineering experience cove a broad range of professional practice, with a focus on heavy industrial foundations and major earth embankments for mining and water storage projects. He has worked in a variety of industries (oil sands and conventional mining, power generation, transportation, industrial and municipal domains) and in geotechnically challenging environments (remote and rugged, marine, and highly seismic) in Canada and internationally.

 

Robert Cross is a Geological Engineer and the Manager of Klohn Crippen Berger’s Toronto Office. He has worked on interesting geotechnical and dam safety challenges for the hydroelectric and mining industries across Canada, as well as internationally in North America, South America, Europe, and Africa. His experience extends to a variety of geological and geotechnical settings, including locations with high seismic hazards, residual soils, liquefaction susceptibility, peaty and compressible soils, and karstic terrain.

 

Vicki Nguyen has 14 years of experience working as a Geotechnical Engineer in Alberta and British Columbia. Over the last ten years, she has performed probabilistic and deterministic seismic hazard assessments and developed numerical models in FLAC 2D and 3D to assess and design slope stabilization measures, calculate seismic deformations, and calibrate model parameters based on field and instrumentation data for tailings facilities, dam structures, and slope stabilization projects around the world. Notable projects include 3D deformation modelling and parameter calibration for the Site C project in British Columbia and developing a comprehensive 3D calibrated deformation model to predict future displacements at Gardiner Dam in Saskatchewan.

SC 8 - Extracting Key Information from a Grain Size Distribution

or any Cumulative Distribution

Date: Sunday, September 15, 2024

Time: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Duration: 8 hours

Price: $450 CAD per participant, $250 CAD per student participant (with valid student ID)

Description

Grain size distributions (GSDs) are obtained with non destructive drilling methods (in most geotechnical studies) or destructive drilling methods (in most groundwater studies). The quality of collected samples strongly depends upon the drilling and sampling procedures. However, these are not always well known or correctly applied. The data quality must therefore be carefully assessed before using the data to predict, for example, permeability or hydraulic parameters. The workshop explains how to extract information from a GSD, which comes from a split spoon and may represent a mixture of different layers in a stratified formation. Detailed methods are provided, with examples, for evaluating the stratification and the field porosity, and for predicting the field saturated hydraulic conductivity and the water retention curve of aquifer materials. The attendees are expected to bring their own computers; they will be given pre-programmed free Excel tools and instructions to make their own analyses and make predictions. The workshop is of interest to those trained in geotechnical engineering, groundwater engineering, and groundwater science, as well as to consultants who examine groundwater and environmental issues.

Instructors

Robert Chapuis holds a D.Sc.A. from Polytechnique Montréal. As a consultant, he was in charge of over 600 engineering projects for 9 years before joining Polytechnique Montréal where he teaches ground water courses as a Full Professor. He has supervised or co-supervised over 100 theses since 1987. His research interests are reliability of field and laboratory tests and numerical analyses for groundwater problems.

Zahia Makkeb graduated in Hydraulic Engineering from École Nationale Polytechnique in Algeria. She is a Ph.D. candidate at Polytechnique Montréal. Her current research focuses on the internal stability of materials used in urban construction and roadways.

Arij Krifa graduated in Hydraulics and Environmental Modelling from École Nationale d’Ingénieurs de Tunis in Tunisia. She is a Ph.D. candidate at Polytechnique Montréal. Her research focuses on unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils, including stratified soils, using reduced-scale models and numerical modelling.

SC 9 - Field Variable-Head (Slug) Tests: Correct Methods

with Free Preprogrammed Excel Files

Date: Sunday, September 15, 2024

Time: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Duration: 8 hours

Price: $450 CAD per participant, $250 CAD per student participant (with valid student ID)

Description

Since the early developments of field variable-head tests (slug tests) in the 1890s, all theories have contained errors in mathematics and physics. The workshop explains how to interpret correctly these tests performed in monitoring wells, driven flush-joint permeameters or between packers, and thus obtain more reliable information. This includes the difference between the assumed piezometric level (PL) for the test and the true PL, extracted from the data themselves, plus information about the slugging action, which incorporates dynamic effects and gas bubbles. Several examples are treated during the workshop. Those attending it are expected to bring their own computers; they will receive pre-programmed free Excel tools and instructions to make their own analyses. The workshop is of interest to people trained in geotechnical engineering, groundwater engineering, and groundwater science, as well as to consultants involved in projects with groundwater and environmental issues.

Instructors

Robert Chapuis holds a D.Sc.A. from Polytechnique Montréal. As a consultant, he was in charge of over 600 engineering projects for 9 years before joining Polytechnique Montréal where he teaches ground water courses as a Full Professor. He has supervised or co-supervised over 100 theses since 1987. His research interests are reliability of field and laboratory tests and numerical analyses for groundwater problems.

Sirine Ben Slima graduated in Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering from École Nationale d’Ingénieurs de Tunis in Tunisia. She is a Ph.D. candidate at Polytechnique Montréal. Her research focuses on reduced-scale models and numerical modelling to improve permeability and tracer tests in monitoring wells.

Afaf Moumin obtained a master’s degree at Royal Military College of Canada and she is a Ph.D. candidate at Polytechnique Montréal. Her research examines how the sealing defects of monitoring wells impact slug test data, using reduced-scale models and numerical modelling.

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